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Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 1, 1873

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 1, 1873
Anthony expresses concern that Hooker will “stay away” from the convention, and how some might interpret that conflict within the suffrage movement. Anthony asks Hooker to write a letter to be read to the convention, and she asks her opinion on recent Supreme Court suffrage decisions. Anthony concludes the letter with a strong statement regarding the lack of freedom in the United States. She writes: "Supreme Court decision- - Two bloody revolutions & one hundred years struggle for freedom- & only one million black male citizens actual possessed of it-" On the verso of the letter, Anthony tells Hooker "My friend Mrs. Hallowell- will be very happy to entertain you at time of my trial should you decide to go to Rochester- I do long for a chat with you-", Mrs. Hallowell likely refers to Mary Post Hallowell, Isaac Post's eldest child. Isaac and Amy lived in Rochester and were close friends of Anthony, and fellow activists. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 1, 1873
Anthony expresses concern that Hooker will “stay away” from the convention, and how some might interpret that conflict within the suffrage movement. Anthony asks Hooker to write a letter to be read to the convention, and she asks her opinion on recent Supreme Court suffrage decisions. Anthony concludes the letter with a strong statement regarding the lack of freedom in the United States. She writes: "Supreme Court decision- - Two bloody revolutions & one hundred years struggle for freedom- & only one million black male citizens actual possessed of it-" On the verso of the letter, Anthony tells Hooker "My friend Mrs. Hallowell- will be very happy to entertain you at time of my trial should you decide to go to Rochester- I do long for a chat with you-", Mrs. Hallowell likely refers to Mary Post Hallowell, Isaac Post's eldest child. Isaac and Amy lived in Rochester and were close friends of Anthony, and fellow activists. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 1, 1873
Anthony expresses concern that Hooker will “stay away” from the convention, and how some might interpret that conflict within the suffrage movement. Anthony asks Hooker to write a letter to be read to the convention, and she asks her opinion on recent Supreme Court suffrage decisions. Anthony concludes the letter with a strong statement regarding the lack of freedom in the United States. She writes: "Supreme Court decision- - Two bloody revolutions & one hundred years struggle for freedom- & only one million black male citizens actual possessed of it-" On the verso of the letter, Anthony tells Hooker "My friend Mrs. Hallowell- will be very happy to entertain you at time of my trial should you decide to go to Rochester- I do long for a chat with you-", Mrs. Hallowell likely refers to Mary Post Hallowell, Isaac Post's eldest child. Isaac and Amy lived in Rochester and were close friends of Anthony, and fellow activists. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 1, 1873
Anthony expresses concern that Hooker will “stay away” from the convention, and how some might interpret that conflict within the suffrage movement. Anthony asks Hooker to write a letter to be read to the convention, and she asks her opinion on recent Supreme Court suffrage decisions. Anthony concludes the letter with a strong statement regarding the lack of freedom in the United States. She writes: "Supreme Court decision- - Two bloody revolutions & one hundred years struggle for freedom- & only one million black male citizens actual possessed of it-" On the verso of the letter, Anthony tells Hooker "My friend Mrs. Hallowell- will be very happy to entertain you at time of my trial should you decide to go to Rochester- I do long for a chat with you-", Mrs. Hallowell likely refers to Mary Post Hallowell, Isaac Post's eldest child. Isaac and Amy lived in Rochester and were close friends of Anthony, and fellow activists. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 1, 1873
Anthony expresses concern that Hooker will “stay away” from the convention, and how some might interpret that conflict within the suffrage movement. Anthony asks Hooker to write a letter to be read to the convention, and she asks her opinion on recent Supreme Court suffrage decisions. Anthony concludes the letter with a strong statement regarding the lack of freedom in the United States. She writes: "Supreme Court decision- - Two bloody revolutions & one hundred years struggle for freedom- & only one million black male citizens actual possessed of it-" On the verso of the letter, Anthony tells Hooker "My friend Mrs. Hallowell- will be very happy to entertain you at time of my trial should you decide to go to Rochester- I do long for a chat with you-", Mrs. Hallowell likely refers to Mary Post Hallowell, Isaac Post's eldest child. Isaac and Amy lived in Rochester and were close friends of Anthony, and fellow activists. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.