Isabella Beecher Hooker

J. H. Ailman to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 23, 1879
J. H. Ailman to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 23, 1879, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 17, 1873
Anthony writes about a lecture tour and wants to know if Hooker can guarantee full audiences in Connecticut for the whole month since she asks Anthony to lecture there. Anthony says: "it seems to me there can be no doubt about your name & mine together, drawing full houses.", The content of this letter refers to Anthony's 1872 trial for illegal voting, and so the letter has been dated by department staff as 1873, and not 1870. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 9, 1874
Anthony writes that she is unhappy with Stanton because she leaves to go on a speaking tour for pay while asking other volunteers to speak on her behalf at an upcoming, May meeting. Anthony says that according to Stanton: "you can get along without me with Phebe [Burgous?]- now isn't that decidely cool? ... But for drill service - for a drag horse - she is not, and cannot be- and it is no use for us to expect it- So I am schooling myself into submission to the inevitable - again- for after all I know the success of our, May meeting is not dependent on her presence or absence --" Anthony concludes by reflecting about the possible work women could do for the poor, criminal and insane if they had power through the ballot. She writes: "now wouldn't it be splendid for us to be free & equal citizens- with the power of the ballot to back our hearts, heads & hands- and we could just go into all the movements to better the conditions of the poor, the insane, the criminal- wouldn't we be happy mortals than to work with power too - I can hardly wait- the good fates though are working together to bring us into this freedom & that rapidly-", [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, February 17, 1873
Anthony writes about her speaking engagements, and her visit to, Martha Coffin Wright and that she missed having Stanton's presence there. Anthony also describes the organization of the upcoming, May meeting., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 6, [1873]
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 6, [1873], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to John Hooker, January 20, 1875
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to John Hooker, January 20, 1875, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 1871
Anthony writes that she is starting overland to San Francisco, and expects to arrive, December 1. She will then go to convention in Sacramento, December 5 and 6, and then to the Nevada state convention with Laura De Force Gordon, then on to Wyoming, Utah, Nebraska and Iowa, and will “take things by storm all along the line”. Anthony encourages Stanton to go to the Washington convention, and says that Washington Territory and Oregon have made Anthony their representative in Washington., Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Paulina Wright Davis
Anthony writes that the new suffrage workers want their expenses paid, but that she, herself works without compensation. Anthony shares her concerns at having to sell the rights of The Revolution to a stock company. She discusses the company and the process of borrowing money in detail. Davis writes about her deteriorating relationship with Lucy Stone, and also comments on the stock company that Anthony mentioned. Davis notes: "poor Susan I know just how she feels it is a heartbreaking thing to yield a pet like this to the cold work Heaven help her for men are hard and women weak & jealous.", [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 19, 1873
Anthony writes about canvassing Monroe County so as to get her side of the case out to prospective jurors. She expresses a feeling of being alone, and hopes Hooker can come support her at the trial. Anthony writes: "But must not fail to be there - for we must make the Welkin ring anew with our War cry for freedom - & our constitutional right to protect it by the ballot- I hear nothing from nobody- all I can do is to run & jump to accomplish the half I see waiting before me.", The content of this letter refers to Anthony's 1872 trial for illegal voting, and so the letter has been dated by department staff as 1873, and not 1870. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Olympia Brown, April 10, 1874
Anthony writes about her mother’s failing health, and the changes they are making to the house to be able to make room for "brother McLean"- her sister's husband. Anthony also describes the planning for the upcoming national meeting in New Jersey, to be held in, May. She reports: "It seems as if nobody cared a [pip?] for holding up our national plan any more - while it does seem to me we ought to do so religiously- and unless I shall be made to see it of no importance - I must work on to secure a good N.J. meeting-", [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 23, 1871
Anthony writes about conditions in Washington Territory where she is engaged to speak. She mentions that women in the Territory already have the right to vote. Anthony mentions that she feels that Stanton is not working her fair share because of her childcare responsibilities. Anthony asks Hooker to write the call to the upcoming convention and have Stanton sign it., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Anthony writes while canvassing in California, about her speaking engagements in Petaluma, Healdsburg, Marysville, Stockton, San Jose, and Santa Cruz. Anthony believes her speeches are being successful., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 27, 1873
Anthony writes the betrayal of confidences which likely refers to Victoria (presumably Woodhull), who Anthony believes fails to tell the truth, and says she will not address the Beecher-Tilton affair. She disagrees with Woodhull that social equality should come before political equality. Anthony speaks of her own battle with the U.S. Court of Appeals and the manipulative U.S. District Attorney assigned to her case, and how District Attorney moved the case out of Rochester to Canandaigua. Anthony expresses the hope that Hooker will come to her support in Canandaigua; and ends with a lament how she cannot tend to a very sick sister because of the trial. Anthony says: “this trial postponement upsets all my plans for a little quiet with my loved and loving family circle – All the rest of you may know such joy – but I never.”, The content of this letter refers to Anthony's 1872 trial for illegal voting, and so the letter has been dated by department staff as 1873, and not 1870. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 13, 1878
Anthony writes about how she wants to visit everyone in the movement to see the progress being made, but knows that is impossible. She continues to describe her mother's worsening condition, and that she must do it as their care-giver got married. Says also that Slayton is going to give her a "New England Route" in, November and, December (presumably for a speaking tour) and that she hopes that she can visit Hooker. Anthony then refer to the ongoing Tilton-Beecher scandal and writes: "my heart aches for her -- But I can see nothing that I can do to help her- the world is sick to death of the whole affair - and whether she speaks the truth or a lie- it wont [sic] believe her any the more... the part that she told me her story in 1870- as she now tells it to the public ... and now, more than ever before- is it wise for all outsiders to keep outside ." Anthony goes on to ask that Hooker stay on with the national organization until after the next convention as she fears Hooker’s public withdrawal from the NWSA "would look like a quarrel...", [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, October 22, 1871
Anthony writes from Olympia, Washington. She is going to Victoria and Vancouver to canvass. Anthony writes about addressing the Washington Territory legislature in a packed hall, arguing that women need suffrage because of the 15th Amendment., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 16, 1872
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 16, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 22, 1870
Anthony writes that “Turnbull promises to report on main question in writing – if he does and a senatorial discussion comes of it, I shall rejoice.” She then goes on to speak of the National Women's Suffrage Association's (NWSA) work with Congress, specifically with Senator Sumner and Logan, and of Senator Logan (who opposed the NWSA bill), Anthony hoped that Hooker “could spike his gun.” Anthony writes about getting ready to go on another speaking tour, but did not have any new clothes. She tells Hooker to send letters to her Rochester address while she is out speaking and that they would be forwarded. Anthony continues on about the platform of the Working Men’s Convention and how she does not think that they “have the elements to make a formidable movement.” Anthony asks to be kept up to date on the progress in Washington and hopes to get her Senate Committee speech written., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 31, 1870
Anthony writes about getting a loan from a man Paulina Wright Davis introduced. He will loan $2000 on condition that Davis and John Hooker sign the note. She also writes of speaking to the Detroit YMCA and says she will “go with the armor of Truth & Justice.”, [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 1, 1872
Anthony asks Hooker's opinion of a draft speech, since she has not written her own remarks in several years. Anthony also mentions the formation of a stock company., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 20, 1871
Anthony writes about her hopes that suffrage publications, including History of the Suffrage movement by Paulina Wright Davis, Mrs. Stanton’s speech, and the Woodhull Memorial will make money. Anthony tells Hooker to have patience with Davis’s gossip., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Anthony writes that she would like Hooker to go to the Washington Convention. Anthony lists the Association members that will be there, and says that there will be “a fine lot of women and good clothes too – all but Susan – and no matter for hers – nobody expects her to appear in `store clothes’.“ Anthony writes that she is glad to hear that Hooker wrote a kind letter to Davis. Anthony also suggests plans for a Connecticut meeting and asks for Hooker’s decisions., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 3, 1869
Anthony writes about feelings of loneliness after Stanton leaves on a trip because all of the suffrage workers she trains go off to work elsewhere, rather than staying to help her. She also describes financial difficulties and writes: "the good words of Hartford are of course cheering- but ah my dear friend they don't pay my printer -" In the letter's postscript she mentions having one of Beecher’s speech printed in full., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 12, 1879
Anthony writes from Stanton's home in Tenafly, New Jersey that she’s on her way to Hartford and would like to visit, and hopes Hooker will be there. Anthony writes that she hopes Hooker will help her to schedule a hearing before the Connecticut legislature., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 20, 1878
Anthony asks Hooker if she will call the Washington Convention for the second week of, December, when Senator Hoar will make the Minority Report. Anthony goes on to imply that Stanton does not want to go to any more national conventions. Anthony describes the reasoning behind removing [Sara Spencer?] from a position within NWSA and writes: "Of course - as usual- Susan is the chief sinner- whereas Susan feels now & has all the time- but too profoundly thankful to have the work done- to complain of the exact manner of doing- Hear greatest fault is charging lack of principle, lack of earnestness, lack of virtue ever- or every one who dissent from her- or criticises her- [brings?] this up", [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 6, 1869
Anthony asks Hooker to write for The Revolution . She says: "you were going to give me a "spicy" - that the word- article on your views & impressions of me & us & the cause of the Revolutioners, weren't you? ... I have the most sublime faith in every earnest woman's instinctive impulse on our great question-" Anthony also asks her to ask Harriet Beecher Stowe to write a series for The Revolution in 1870 that will be to women’s suffrage as Uncle Tom’s Cabin was to the abolition movement. Anthony equates women (including Mrs. Beecher) as slaves to men, having to give them everything., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, December 17, 1871
Anthony writes about her reception in San Francisco and addresses to the California legislature, and that her speeches in California were meet with huge ovations. She asks Stanton to complete all resolutions for the convention. Anthony mentions that Laura De Force Gordon was unanimously selected as a delegate to the suffrage convention., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to John Hooker, October 2, 1874
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to John Hooker, October 2, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 1, 1873
Anthony expresses concern that Hooker will “stay away” from the convention, and how some might interpret that conflict within the suffrage movement. Anthony asks Hooker to write a letter to be read to the convention, and she asks her opinion on recent Supreme Court suffrage decisions. Anthony concludes the letter with a strong statement regarding the lack of freedom in the United States. She writes: "Supreme Court decision- - Two bloody revolutions & one hundred years struggle for freedom- & only one million black male citizens actual possessed of it-" On the verso of the letter, Anthony tells Hooker "My friend Mrs. Hallowell- will be very happy to entertain you at time of my trial should you decide to go to Rochester- I do long for a chat with you-", Mrs. Hallowell likely refers to Mary Post Hallowell, Isaac Post's eldest child. Isaac and Amy lived in Rochester and were close friends of Anthony, and fellow activists. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 11, 1869
Anthony mentions that, Mary Livermore will sell The Agitator to “the Boston people” who have organized a stock company for $10,000, and says that Livermore will come east to live, lecture, and edit the paper. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote a postscript., [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 7, 1872
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 7, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 25, 1873
Anthony writes about postponement of the trial, possible bench warrant, and the newspaper coverage of her trial., The content of this letter refers to Anthony's 1872 trial for illegal voting, and so the letter has been dated by department staff as 1873, and not 1870. , [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, ca., May 22, 1871
Anthony writes about the California campaign. She also describes a letter she wrote to Paulina Wright Davis in which she " owned up that I had told Hooker of all of her criticisms and objections to her- & begged her to join with me & all of us in an effort to make us rule for any other than each for number one - If we only can come to that principle - we shall hear much less talk about others -", [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Susan B. Anthony to Josephine S. Griffing, May 21, 1871
Anthony writes about the California campaign. She also describes a letter she wrote to Paulina Wright Davis in which she " owned up that I had told Hooker of all of her criticisms and objections to her- & begged her to join with me & all of us in an effort to make us rule for any other than each for number one - If we only can come to that principle - we shall hear much less talk about others -", [Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Box D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
[Chas] Atwater to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 7, 1878
[Chas] Atwater to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 7, 1878, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
John Barber to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 7, 1874
Barber wants to verify that Hooker would be present at a suffrage meeting. He also wants to know if Joseph Hawley is in favor of suffrage. Barber knows him as strong anti-slavery man, but Mrs. Comstock thinks he is opposed to woman suffrage, and if so, he must be defeated at all hazards., John Barber to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 7, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Lucy L. Barber to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 6, 1880
This is a copy of a letter Barber sent elsewhere (recipient unknown) regarding the right of women to the vote., Lucy L. Barber to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 6, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Catherine Beecher to John Hooker, March 15, 1875
Letter from Catherine Beecher to John Hooker, March 15, 1875, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 9, 1872
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 9, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 12, 1874
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 12, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to John Hooker, March 19, 1875
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to John Hooker, March 19, 1875, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.