Isabella Beecher Hooker

Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 9, 1872
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 9, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to John Hooker, March 19, 1875
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to John Hooker, March 19, 1875, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 15, 1870
Blackwell writes about orders for Hooker’s tracts on the Bible and woman suffrage. He asks for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s address so he can send her a sample copy of The Woman’s Journal., Henry Browne Blackwell (1825 –1909) was an American advocate for social and economic reform. He was one of the founders of the Republican Party and the American Woman Suffrage Association. He was married to Lucy Stone. Together they founded The Woman's Journal in 1870 in Boston, Massachusetts, as a weekly newspaper. The new paper incorporated Mary A. Livermore's The Agitator , as well as a lesser known periodical called The Woman's Advocate . Contributors included Stone, Blackwell, Mary Livermore, Julia Ward Howe, and Thomas Wentworth Higginson. , Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 15, 1870, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to John Hooker, January 24, 1870
Blackwell suggests that Hooker have his wife's tracts stereotyped so they can be produced whenever an order comes in. Blackwell continues: “My wife Lucy Stone asks me to invite yourself & Mrs. Hooker to come to Boston on the 28th (next Friday) to participate in our meeting to form a Mass [achusetts] W.[oman] S.[uffrage] Assn. I shall be heartily glad to have from you both the same cordial sympathy & cooperation which you have with that in N.Y.”, In this letter Blackwell may be referring to growing divide in the women's suffrage movement, as Anthony and Stanton focus on a national campaign, while Blackwell and Stone focus on state-wide efforts. , Henry Browne Blackwell to John Hooker, January 24, 1870, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 21, 1871
Blackwell encourages Hooker to write a letter for publication in The Woman's Journal describing the suffrage activities of the Connecticut association., Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 21, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 23, 1872
Blackwell acknowledges Hooker's "suggestion for a conference between the 'Nationals' & 'Americans' with a view to concerted action in the Fall Campaign is both timely and important.... I wish that you, Mrs. Stanton & Miss Anthony could meet Mrs. Livermore, Lucy Stone & myself at some central point... and compare views in advance of the Philadelphia Convention." Blackwell goes on to share his strategy for how to develop influence with the Republican Party. He shares with Hooker his opinion that the only way to obtain women's suffrage is to make "women a power in politics," and approach the Republican Party about making suffrage a plank in their platform. He writes: "Now that Horace Greeley, Murat Halsted Horace White & other bitter opponents of Woman Suffrage have drawn off and the Republican party threatened with serious disintegration, I think there is a Providential opportunity .", Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 23, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 2, 1874
Blackwell writes about turning fifty years old and nearing the end of his life. He mentions hosting Susan [B. Anthony] and the "stirring" lecture she gave over the holidays., Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 2, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 26, 1871
Blackwell encourages Hooker to speak at the upcoming Massachusetts convention, and encloses a free pass to the meeting., Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 26, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 11, 1872
Blackwell responds to news from Hooker and reflects: "I am sorry but not disappointed at the silence of the Democrats on the Woman question- If you had known them as well as I do, you would have realized that, with some honorable exception, they are a century behind the Republicans." Rather than continue with pursuing that strategy, Blackwell advises Hooker: "the only policy that can carry woman suffrage is a policy of conciliation and an uncompromising fidelity to the party that has pledged itself to a respectful consideration of woman's rights.", Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 11, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, July 11, 1872
Blackwell encourages Stanton to rally support for Ulysses S. Grant and Henry Wilson running on the Republican ticket, as a next step after the Democrats refused to support a women's suffrage plank in their platform at their convention., Henry Browne Blackwell to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, July 11, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 2, 1872
Blackwell offers advice to Hooker for appealing to the Democrats at their upcoming convention in Baltimore. Blackwell suggests that the "Kansas & Iowa Democrats more likely to help you than any others.", Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 2, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 8, 1873
Blackwell writes that he must "decline to publish your letter relative to Miss Anthony, because it is based upon a misapprehension of the facts, and [obliterated] judgment, would do injustice both to Miss A. & to the Congress." Blackwell encourages Hooker to form a Woman Suffrage Political Club, based on the example of the Massachusetts Society., Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 8, 1873, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 10, 1872
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 10, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 31, 1872
Blackwell continues to advocate for finding allies within the Republican Party. He concludes the letter: "I am not [sanguine?] of success in Phil.[delphia] We have been too deeply compromised by Mrs. Woodhull's extravagances to command sufficient public confidence & respect at present, I fear. But we must do our best. I am glad you see the necessity of obeying 'elective affinities' in regard to organizations...", Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 31, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Sarah Ellen Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Blackwell writes about not having time to distribute the circulars that she is now forwarding to Hooker. She also recommends that Hooker read the newspaper Voice of Angels, which she describes as a spirit newspaper. Blackwell also recommends a recent book by Emmett Densmore., Sarah Ellen was one of Henry's sisters. , Sarah Ellen Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Lillie Devereux Blake to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 14, 1880
The letter was written on the letterhead of the New York City Suffrage Society. Blake hopes Hooker will be at the next meeting, and that she receives at her home on Friday evenings, and would very much like to see her and any friends Hooker wants to bring., Lillie Devereux Blake to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 14, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to John Hooker, April 8, 1874
Browne alludes to a letter that Hooker sent his wife. Isabella and Olympia are together at the time of Browne's response. The exact details of Hooker's letter are not described here. Browne writes: "I am astonished at what Mrs. Hooker has told me of Mr. Burton's course: to me it seems simply impertinent, but if it draws you nearer to Mrs. Hooker or arouses you to a new interest in reform I shall see in it the Providence of God leading you on through dreary deserts of disappointment & sorrow to the promised land of light & liberty and love.", Olympia Brown to John Hooker, April 8, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 28, 1874
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 28, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 12, 1873
Browne shares her displeasure at receiving a letter from Hooker the same day as she sent out the letter described above. Browne chastises Hooker: "as to casting the responsibility of getting up the meeting on me it is absurd, you say you are nearly & are only ^waiting^ till spring to leave the continent & go to Europe well I am weary & I have my household & my parish two sermons every week to be got & meetings three evenings in the week & no sort of hopes of resting in Europe but must stand at my post year after year, now if there is any meeting at New Haven it is evident that you will just have to put your hand to the work." Browne alludes to the Tilton-Beecher scandal as a possible reason why Hooker may not want to plan the upcoming convention. She advises: "just let your brothers affairs rest and attend to this meeting our cause is more important than ten thousand Beechers besides you can do nothing about his affairs he must work out his own salvation or condemnation & we must do likewise & we had better begin it by making this N.[ew] H.[ampshire] meeting a success.", Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 12, 1873, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Browne writes of a recent sermon share gave with a women's suffrage theme. She expresses interest in having Anthony come to Bridgeport, and possibly her church, to give a lecture., Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Olympia Brown to John Hooker, September 11, 1874
Letter from Olympia Brown to John Hooker, September 11, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 15, 1876
Browne writes about recent activities of Connecticut suffragists, and her church., Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 15, 1876, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 9, 1874
Browne writes of the travel plans of Stanton and Anthony to go to Washington, D.C. and her hopes for the upcoming convention in Connecticut. Browne encloses a letter written by a Mr. Chapin to her about possibly bringing Anthony to Connecticut to lecture. His letter is dated, January 13, 1874., Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 9, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 9, 1876
Browne writes about her thoughts for how to have the most impact at the upcoming "exposition." This likely refers to the 1876 celebration of the country's centennial, held in Philadelphia., Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 9, 1876, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 4, 1873
Browne thanks Hooker for the salubrious effect her recent visit had. Browne shares the positive impression that area teachers had of Hooker when she attended their recent meetings., Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 4, 1873, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 12, 1873
Browne explains her view that conventions should be open to all who support women's rights, and not just for women., Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 12, 1873, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 12, 1876
Browne writes in response to Hooker's ideas about the upcoming exposition. Browne writes: "it seems to me that in soliciting subscriptions it would be well to present the subject as a great educational work that we are intending to do in Phil. without dwelling especially on the fact that it is to be done by the national association. Few people outside a very narrow circle know the difference between the associations, all interested in suffrage must see the great opportunity which next summer affords to educate the people on this subject, our work in Phil can be nothing more than educational & in this all parties are alike, interested, there is no difference between the associations in ideas or methods while the work is purely educational, it is when we come to legislation &c that the difference comes in.", Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 12, 1876, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 2, 1876
Browne writes about recent activities of Connecticut suffragists, and her church., Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 2, 1876, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Olympia Brown to Frances Ellen Burr, July 6, 1876
Browne resigns from executive committee of the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association, and from all associations as her tenure at a Bridgeport church has ended., Olympia Brown to Frances Ellen Burr, July 6, 1876, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Ellen Buer to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 21, 1879
In this signed letter, Buer shares the latest gossip about, Julia Smith’s recent marriage at an older age., Ellen Buer to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 21, 1879, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
William F. Channing to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 10, 1880
Found in The Revolution envelope with the calling card of Ruth C. Denison. He writes that the “woman suffrage movement in New England is in a decadent condition generally...The Boston (American) Society is without life or influence. All the work of any importance is being done by the National Society.", William F. Channing to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 10, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Miriam Cole to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 27, [18--]
The letter states that Cole she must decline Hooker’s invitation to speak at the Washington convention. She also speaks against the union of the two societies (likely the NWSA and the AWSA), and states that Hooker “stands aloof from the contending centers.”, Miriam Cole to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 27, [18--], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 6, 1875
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 6, 1875, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Unknown, May 28, 18[7?]
Comstock writes from Kobe, Japan about a mission she is participating in. Many of the members of her group have returned to the United States due to illness., Hannah Comstock to Unknown, May 28, 18[7?], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 5, 1871
Comstock writes about a recent suffrage meeting in which Mrs. Brown, likely Olympia Brown, spoke. She also shares her views about Victoria Woodhull, and says: "I want to know her better. I am more & more interested in her. And sometimes wonder why I am so strongly attracted towards her. It is a mystery to me, far from the views I have always entertained on those points she is so radical on I should have supposed I should have been one who would have joined the hue & cry against her Thank God I am not- I somehow seem impressed with the belief that she is right, and that we shall some day see the truth in her as it is.", Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 5, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 17, 1874
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 17, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 2, 1877
Comstock shares with Hooker her thoughts about Spiritualism. She writes: I like to obtain true knowledge on the subject of Spiritualism & to a certain extent am a believer in its doctrines, but much in the dark. The modern theory of the Spirit-World is not to me attractive. I prefer the Earth with its earthly work which is real and [illegible] upon me. The mistakes and uncertainties of the Spirit-world are at variance with all my preconceived ideas of its perfect knowledge & stability, if God should grant me more perfect spirit knowledge, I might become fascinated with it, but as yet behind the veil which I know to be thin there rises up a stern awful reality which I draw back from facing. God grant that when my time comes I may boldly enter and find rest.", Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 2, 1877, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 7, 1872
Comstock expresses her views on the developments in the Tilton-Beecher scandal: "I feel much for your brother, but if these charges are true & he attempts to escape under Mrs. Woodhull's skirts all the more dreadful will his fall be in the end. Have you anything to say to ^me^ about it, any advise [sic] to give or any light and I would add any work. I am ready for work on this great social question & care but little what is said if I may only see & do my duty. As it was in the day of Adam, the woman who had done the wrong, so now in this last day the woman must bear the blame., Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 7, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 14, 1871
Comstock comments on recent events: "How much I do thank Mrs Stanton for saying such brave words for Mrs Woodhull. I want to know ever so much more about her.", Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 14, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 6, 1874
Comstock shares with Hooker the question that her suffrage organization will be discussing the following week: "Are the existing differences in compensation for male & female labor justifiable?", Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 6, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.