Isabella Beecher Hooker

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 31, 1877
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 31, 1877, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 27, 1872
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 27, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 21, 18[7?]
Comstock writes about the stroke her brother has suffered that has left him without the ability to speak and paralyzed., Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 21, 18[7?], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 19, 1871
Comstock expresses her remorse at Hooker's ill health. She advises: "I have been a great sufferer myself at different time from the same trouble & know just how bad it make you feel. Let me mention two simple remedies, that are said to be good. I have used them freely for years. Crab apple jelly, & cubebs, use the former freely with your meals, the latter always by you & taken several in the course of the day-" Comstock goes on to report about a recent suffrage meeting held. She explains: "your letter proved a perfect God send to us. I read parts of it, and it would have done your soul good to see the interest manifested, all here ready for work, and said just as soon as they had the petitions they would go to work, men & women talked freely- and for the first time in my life I spoke out loud in meeting. My husband was Chairman & I sat beside him & together we performed wonders. I spoke of the call for the national convention at Washington, and they asked me to read it, which I accordingly did... It was like the Bugle blast to arms of the old Scottish Chiefs in the days of Bruce & Wallace.", Cubebs, which is mentioned in this letter, consist of the dried unripe fruit of the plant Cubeba officinalis, which is cultivated in Java. Cubeb is listed in the Compendium as a Diuretic that is also slightly purgative. It can be used in the treatment of "gonorrhoea, gleets, fluor albus, urinary irritations, and gravel." , Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 19, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 30, 1872
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 30, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Davis writes am angrily worded letter related to suggestions Hooker has made about speaking salaries, and office holders. She writes: "My judgment, and feelings are never warped by what I hear. I must see and know for myself to judge. I do not mean to judge you harshly but I cannot feel that you have worked unselfishly and am sorry oh so sorry. You came into the work after it is comparatively popular you have as yet suffered nothing, but you have caused pain to some of us, and I may as well tell you as to carry it longer in my heart.", Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 31, 18[--]
Davis responds to a decision whether to change the name of the suffrage newspaper The Revolution to a name more attractive to more potential supporters. She suggests that the suffrage movement should have focused on an equal rights campaign from the beginning, which would have appealed to more people., Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 31, 18[--], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 7, 18[--]
Davis writes in response to a circular that Hooker wrote and sent her. She offers feedback to strengthen the call, and asks Hooker to clarify decisions she made about which suffrage leaders to include in the call, and how that might impact the audiences' expectations., Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 7, 18[--], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Paulina Wright Davis to "My Dear Sister", ca. August 1869
Davis writes, presumably to Hooker, about the deteriorating relationships among those in the women's movement, and the abolitionist movement. She says: "I am certain that these miserable quarrels among reformers do more harm than any and all other things combined. Look at Mr. Garrison's position in feud with half his old warm friends. Phillips with his hand against everyman not on some great principle but some miserable permeability. The Mrs. Ball at war with all the women in Boston or they with her... we don't deserve justice until we learn mercy so each others faults... I pity Lucy Stone from my heart I believe she is at times insane or I think she could not do what she does but I could not trust any profession of friendship from her and this is more than I ever said to anyone else about her but I went through such a bitter experience years ago and learned then to stand alone. I pity Elizabeth Stanton too not in the same way she is grieved, hurt pierced to the very heart, a whole avalanche of rude [illegible] beside the hard thrusts of criticism.", Paulina Wright Davis to "My Dear Sister", ca. August 1869, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 13, 18[--]
Davis writes that she misses Hooker and hopes she can come to the upcoming convention., Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 13, 18[--], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Davis alludes to the growing divide between suffrage leaders and Lucy Stone. She concludes her letter: "I wonder Mrs. L is not crazy, attacked and criticized publically (all very right that) but [illegible]ful that she has enemies secretly working against her her private moral character maligned her every utterance watched and misconstrued...", Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from E.B. Fairfield to John Hooker, October 10, 1877
Letter from E.B. Fairfield to John Hooker, October 10, 1877, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Sarah E. Fuller to Honorable George Hubbard, April 19, 1877
The enclosure was typed on Sorosis Society letterhead. She asks for a copy of the bill which recently passed the Connecticut legislature-the Connecticut, Married Women’s Act of 1877. Enclosed is a Sorosis Society circular about higher education for women., Sarah E. Fuller to Honorable George Hubbard, April 19, 1877, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Sarah E. Fuller to Alfred Burr and Frank H. Burr, April 2, 1877
Alfred Burr and Frank H. Burr were editors of the Hartford Times. In this letter Fuller writes: “Resolved that we tender our hearty congratulations to the married women of Connecticut, on the recent passage of the bill introduced by Hon. George Hubbard, equalizing the property conditions of the sexes, and enabling the women to earn and hold the sacred home.” This letter refers to the Connecticut, Married Women’s Act of 1877., Sarah E. Fuller to Alfred Burr and Frank H. Burr, April 2, 1877, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Matilda Joslyn Gage to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 7, 1871
In this letter Gage expresses anger that she was not invited to the 1871 convention in Washington D.C., despite her involvement before Paulina Wright Davis became involved., Matilda Joslyn Gage to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 7, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Matilda Joslyn Gage to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 14, 1871
In this signed letter, Gage writes that she will attend the upcoming convention, at Davis's urging, but that she is still hurt by Mr. Hooker's actions regarding a Hartford convention., Matilda Joslyn Gage to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 14, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
S. Helen Gale to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 1, 1879
Gale writes that the interview with S. L. Hall was obtained., S. Helen Gale to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 1, 1879, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
[F. J.?] Hallock to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, ca., June 2
[F. J.?] Hallock to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, ca., June 2, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 22, 1870
Hanaford writes that she is sorry Hooker is ill and unable to make the upcoming convention: "women of your noble spirit deserve health., May God restore it to you!", Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 22, 1870, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 25, 1871
Hanaford writes that she is resigning her position on the executive committee. She explains: "With Miss Brown I do not care to converse at present upon Suffrage matters, as her last remarks ^to me^ in regard to some points did not meet my approbation, and I prefer to be called a Pharisee rather than a free-lover. I did not hear Lucy Stone's 'red-herring' story, to which you refer, but I am a member of the Americans Society- helped to form it at Cleveland- and I presume that my sympathies are with her in reference to 'ride-issues.'", A Pharisee is a member of an ancient Jewish sect, distinguished by strict observance of the traditional and written law, and commonly held to have pretensions to superior sanctity. , Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 25, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 4, 1870
Hanaford asks Hooker if she can speak before the Connecticut legislature. Hanaford has asked Olympia Brown, but she may be unable to come, and Hanaford writes that she feels "incompetent" and would rather not speak herself., Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 4, 1870, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 28, 1871
Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 28, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 28, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 28, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 2, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 2, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 6, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 6, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, December 4, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, December 4, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 24, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 24, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, November 9, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, November 9, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, November 22, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, November 22, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Elizabeth Tilton, January 7, 1873
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Elizabeth Tilton, January 7, 1873, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Isabella Beecher Hooker to Ellen Clark Sargent, March 13, 1878
Ellen Clark Sargent lived in Washington, D.C. and frequently hosted Hooker and others as they visited the city to make their appeal to Congress. As described in Ed. Ann Gordon's Selected Letters of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, Volume III . , Isabella Beecher Hooker to Ellen Clark Sargent, March 13, 1878, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, November 21, [1869]
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, November 21, [1869], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 23, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 23, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 18, 1875
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 18, 1875, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 1, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 1, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 31, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 31, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 11, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 11, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.