Isabella Beecher Hooker

Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 21, 1879
Leggett owned a boarding house where Hooker stayed, called Clinton Plan., Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 21, 1879, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 27-September 9
Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 27-September 9, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Mary A. Livermore, October 18, 1869
Livermore writes from Chicago and is on her way to Boston. From there she will travel to Hartford to attend Hooker's upcoming convention., Mary A. Livermore, October 18, 1869, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Loring Moody to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 28, 1880
In this signed letter Moody discusses the current status of women., Loring Moody to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 28, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
R. D. Mussey to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 28, 1870
In this signed letter Mussey offers to speak at the convention to “state my reasons for urging this Reform” of women's enfranchisement. Mussey suggeststhat he knew Hooker as a young boy., R. D. Mussey to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 28, 1870, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
John Neal to Paulina Wright Davis, October 28, 1869
Neal writes to Davis about a meeting he recently had with Lucy Stone. He advises Davis to avoid debate about the 15th amendment in favor of remaining focused on the cause of women's suffrage. Davis wrote a note on the bottom of the verso: "I do not think we will promise not to use the 15th amendment if we think it will stir an audience more than anything else. Mrs. S. [Stone?] address has published in full several times of course she does not wish to use that.", John Neal to Paulina Wright Davis, October 28, 1869, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Colonel Andrew J. Rogers to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 26, 1880
In this signed letter, written on Cosmo-American Colonization letterhead, Rogers introduces himself to Hooker and includes a letter of introduction for himself and, Augusta Smith, from Mrs. A. D. Smith of New York. He hopes Hooker will assist him in some Christian political work., Colonel Andrew J. Rogers to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 26, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Lita Barney Sayles to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 7, [18--]
This signed letter was written on the verso of a tri-fold leaflet entitled “Summary of topicstreated in papers read at the annual public sessions.” The presidents were listed as: Mrs., Mary A. Livermore, Professor, Maria Mitchell, and Mrs., Julia Ward Howe. The letter by Sayles discusses who to place as vice-president of the Connecticut suffragists at the Woman’s Congress. She talks about bringing three women together in a state congress for the advancement of women, since she feels smaller groups may work better. She asks Hooker for a friend’s name to put forward as the vice president of the Connecticut suffragists at the Woman’s Congress., Lita Barney Sayles to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 7, [18--], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Caroline M. Severance to Paulina Wright Davis, August 16, 1869
Severance apologizes for not being able to go to the upcoming Newport convention, because it conflicts with another convention. She goes on to describe the difficulties and possible negatives of having so many suffrage organizations- state-wide and nationals., Caroline M. Severance to Paulina Wright Davis, August 16, 1869, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Caroline M. Severance to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 19, 1869
Caroline M. Severance to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 19, 1869, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Thomas G. Shearman to John Hooker, April 16, 1875
Letter from Thomas G. Shearman to John Hooker, April 16, 1875, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Anne D. Smith to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 26, 1880
Originally housed in the same envelope with the letter written by Colonel Andrew J. Rogers to Hooker., Anne D. Smith to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 26, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Julia E. Smith to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Note by Smith presenting Hooker with a gift book., , Julia E. Smith to Isabella Beecher Hooker, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 16, 187[1?]
Stanton writes that she hopes Hooker and Brown are working to make the Washington Convention a success. Stanton comments on Anthony lecture tour out west and says that she “is stirring them all along the line” and Laura De Force Gordon is with her. Stanton writes about the benefit of including suffrage songs at the upcoming convention. Stanton also mentioned the impact, Julia Griffing's illness has had on planning for the convention and the overall campaign in Washington, D.C., Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 16, 187[1?], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, ca. 1880s
Stanton asks Hooker to speak to Henry Beecher about speaking at one of the suffrage meetings. Stanton also asks Hooker to write about Anthony and her impact on the movement for “`The Golden Age’ In Revolution In Woodhull’s.“ Stanton believes that Hooker can write about Anthony's achievements objectively since Stanton feels that Anthony is “too much a part of myself & my work for me to do it.”, Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, ca. 1880s, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, 1870
Stanton writes that she has forwarded Hooker's letter about Davis to Davis. Stanton expresses interest in Hooker writing a biographical piece about Davis's spiritual life. Stanton hopes that Hooker might "overlook the weak points in a character and see what is grand and noble." Stanton goes on ask if Hooker will be at the upcoming Washington convention because "your presence gives me great strength and as we have alike a keen sense of the ridiculous, I enjoy with you an occasional laugh at the follies we cannot ignore.", Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, 1870, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 24, 1880
Stanton asks Hooker for reminiscences for The History of the Woman Suffrage volume that she has begun to work on. Stanton sends regards from Anthony, and asks Hooker about the legislative session. Stanton then writes about not receiving an invitation to a friend's wedding, which might be a reference to Lucy Stone and her family., Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 24, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 2, 1874
Stanton writes that her temperance speeches in Rochester and Detroit had immense audiences. Stanton writes that Hooker is wanted as President for the National Convention next year. She then asks about when Hooker will be leaving for Europe. Stanton shares her impressions of Governor George Bayley, of Michigan and his family, whom she stayed with during a recent campaign., Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 2, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Paulina Wright Davis, August 10, 1869
Stanton writes to Davis that she feels as though Thomas Wentworth Higginson does not understand her. Stanton goes on to say: "I dread conventions more than I can tell and if you are all willing I will never show my face in one again, the behavior of reformers, the scandalous talk of Lucy Stone...", Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Paulina Wright Davis, August 10, 1869, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to "Friend", December 10, 1871
This letter was likely written to Hooker. Stanton writes that she has signed the memorial and returned it, and is glad she (likely Hooker) appreciates Olympia Brown. Says that Brown is “a second Susan in pluck & magnanimity,” and that she understood from the beginning that together with [IJG?], Hooker would “steer the ship” at the upcoming Washington convention., Elizabeth Cady Stanton to "Friend", December 10, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to John Hooker, January 8, 1875
Letter from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to John Hooker, January 8, 1875, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to John Hooker, September 23, 1874
Letter from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to John Hooker, September 23, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Lucy Stone to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 18, 1872
Lucy Stone to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 18, 1872, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Lucy Stone to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 4, 1869
Stone shares her opinions about slow progress with gaining supporters for women's right to vote, and argues in favor of working against Horace Greeley, who has long opposed their campaign., Lucy Stone to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 4, 1869, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Harriet Beecher Stowe to John Hooker, September 27, 1874
Letter from Harriet Beecher Stowe to John Hooker, September 27, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Kate Trimble to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 25, 1878
Letter written in Covington, Kentucky. In this signed letter Trimble asks to receive more suffrage petitions and mentions that petitioning is going well and that she is “having these petitions signed largely by the most influential men and women in the state.”, Kate Trimble to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 25, 1878, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Alice Underwood to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 6, 1879
Underwood expresses her hope that Hooker will visit Washington in the winter as it is the long season of Congress. She wonders if: “the suffrage movement will be agitated as two years ago –Though I fear it is folly to expect any action that requires liberality from the body of men now representing the country.”, Alice Underwood to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 6, 1879, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Unknown writer to "Dear Brownie", January 18, 1874
This letter is believed to have been written to Olympia Brown. It refers to Susan B. Anthony and Isabella Beecher Hooker. The writer describes the state approach to secure women's suffrage in Connecticut. The writer believes: "an act of the legislature can permit women to vote in town meetings- & in school districts also . He [Mr. Hooker] will make a little tract on this before we go- & next spring we will ask our suffrage legislature to decree that all women who pay taxes on five hundred dollars of real estate or personal property may vote- no one will dare vote against this.", Unknown writer to "Dear Brownie", January 18, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
J. H. Vail to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 12, 1880
This signed letter was written on the Winsted Herald, which was published in Connecticut. Vail discusses a submitted suffrage article., J. H. Vail to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 12, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
J. H. Vail to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 30, 1880
J. H. Vail to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 30, 1880, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
S. A. Vibbert to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 14, [18--]
In this signed letter, Vibbert asks Hooker to speak at a meeting on, July 4, 5, and 6 in Princeton, Massachusetts., S. A. Vibbert to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 14, [18--], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Mrs. A. H. Walker to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, December 4, 1871
Walker writes to Stanton on behalf of the St. Johns Suffrage Association in Michigan imploring her to come and speak to the community. Walker laments that they may not be able to raise the speaker, but that Stanton's voice and leadership is needed there. Walker states: "Oh! My Dear Mrs Stanton we need you as a strong tower on which to rest our struggling effort and chain the hearts of our friends." Stanton seems to have forwarded the letter to Hooker, and in a note appended to the end of Mrs. Walker’s letter, asks Hooker and Olympia Brown to come to her home in Tenafly, New Jersey to visit Anthony during Christmas week. Stanton goes on to say that she has so many requests to speak that she could “three times a day, & Sunday too.” Stanton concludes by saying, “Do not for mercy’s sake make me the responsible head. I urged Susan to make you President and not me… I am tired of being a figurehead to be shot at.”, Mrs. A. H. Walker to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, December 4, 1871, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
William A. Williams to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 27, 1878
Williams introduces himself and asks for a job working for the suffrage cause., William A. Williams to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 27, 1878, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Letter from Victoria Woodhull to Isabella Beecher Hooker, [August 6, 1872]
Letter from Victoria Woodhull to Isabella Beecher Hooker, [August 6, 1872], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
[W.M.C.] to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 14, 1874
The writer speaks about the most recent meeting and says Hooker “should include New Haven in her course of lectures,” and believes that Hooker would do very well there. The writer also suggests New Hampshire as a place for the convention since” so many wanted to hear Miss Anthony...those who heard her liked her so much and would gladly hear her again.”, [W.M.C.] to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 14, 1874, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Unknown to [Isabella Beecher Hooker]
The letter is undated and unsigned, presumably to Hooker, which mentions Stanton and Anthony., Unknown to [Isabella Beecher Hooker], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Fragmentary draft letter about Isabella Beecher Hooker's visit to Niagara Falls
Fragmentary draft letter about Isabella Beecher Hooker's visit to Niagara Falls, Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
"Woman's Suffrage. The Petition for a, Declaratory Act.", [1872]
"Woman's Suffrage. The Petition for a, Declaratory Act.", [1872], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.
Unknown writer to "Dear Brownie"
This letter is a one page fragment., Unknown writer to "Dear Brownie", Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester.