Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History

Audio Interview, Jim Mulcahy, March 30, 2012
Jim Mulcahy is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. He describes his church activism in Rochester and how his negotiated religion with his own sexual orientation. He details the equal marriage movement in Rochester with organizations such as Open Arms and the Rochester Religious Community for Equal Marriage. Mulcahy also discusses the spread of AIDS/HIV and how the diseases were addressed in Parkridge Hospital and Strong Hospital. Mulcahy, towards the latter half of the interview, talks about his experiences with coming out of the closet, attending Rochester's gay picnic, engaging in gay activism, relations with ethnic churches, and traveling abroad to Ukraine to study theology., Audio Interview, Jim Mulcahy, March 30, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6574
Audio Interview, Jimmy Catalano, May 17, 2012
Jimmy Catalano is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Catalano was a florist at Kittelberger's in Rochester. Prior to this position, he had his own floral shop on Park Avenue at Edgerton Florists. Catalano describes coming out around 1978 and how he interacted with the gay bars in the city, such as Jim's, Friar's, The Avenue Pub, The Forum, La Saloon, Bulwinkle's, Dick's 43, and The Riverview. Catalano also details the impact of the AIDS epidemic on the gay community and the responses it garnered from the general public. He speaks to the community support in Rochester, including Helping People with AIDS and the first Dining for Dollars event with Neil Parisella as the director. Catalano then shifts to discussing the drag scene in Rochester, and goes into detail with his own Drag Queen persona, "Carmen Miranda." He explains that he performed at Friar's, but that the first drag show in Rochester was at the Labor Lyceum at St. Paul Street in the late 1970s. Catalano also discusses the the Miss Rochester pageants and why the Drag Queen community became so popularized within the gay community., Audio Interview, Jimmy Catalano, May 17, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6546
Audio Interview, Jo Meleca-Voigt, August 17, 2013
Jo Meleca-Voigt is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. Voigt discusses the effects of Christianity upon her upbringing and her thinking in high school in the late 1980s. She describes how she did not know about Stonewall until she was in her mid-twenties in graduate school when she came out at Ohio State. Voigt reveals that she received considerable discrimination as a teacher when she taught in Greece, New York. Voigt also discusses the influence of Tim Mains and becoming involved in the Democratic Party politics (in the Greece Democratic Committee). Voigt also worked with Marriage Equality USA and within Rochester. She lists inspirational figures such as Nelson Mandela and her wife, Christine. Towards the end of her interview, Voigt states that there is a need for federal marriage and supporting the trans community., Audio Interview, Jo Meleca-Voigt, August 17, 2013, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6592
Audio Interview, Joe Cimino, January 24, 2012
Joe Cimino is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Cimino was on the police force in Rochester from the 1960s until 1985. He describes how he was born and raised in Rochester and what Front Street was like in 1959. He explains that it was full of business during the day and then the gay bars were more visible during the night. From his perspective, he describes how the streets were an area of active solicitation and thus needed police presence. Cimino explains how he was on the narcotics squad in 1960 and maintains that there were no outstanding drug problems in Rochester. Cimino was also a sergeant in charge of the tactical unit. Cimino reveals that the police had to keep an eye out for people in places like Durand Eastman Park because of murders and then he progresses to discuss the murder of Martha Gruttadauria at Dick's 43. Cimino contends that the police's focus was targeted at organized crime rather than the gay community. At the end of the interview, Cimino and the interviewers discuss the benefits of the gay community's police liaison in the 1970s and how Gordon Urlacher played a pivotal role in sustaining the peace., Audio Interview, Joe Cimino, January 24, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6547
Audio Interview, Joe Termotto, July 19, 2012
Joe Termotto is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Termotto was in Rochester in the 1950s. He explains how he married a woman from Mercy in 1958, but divorced in 1965 due to their inability to have children. Termotto reveals that he had met someone at Martha's bar in 1962, and then met his partner for 38 years, Joel Divito, on Stone Street. Termotto describes gay life in Rochester until the 1960s. especially detailing the gay community's relationship with the police. Termotto did not recall the Gay Liberation Front and other activist organizations, but he describes his interactions with lesbians in the gay community at Martha's and Ma Martin's. Toward the end of the interview, Termotto describes the gay scene for elderly members of the community and discusses being gay in the medical profession at Rochester General Hospital., Audio Interview, Joe Termotto, July 19, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6637
Audio Interview, John W. Grace and Nelson Baldo, May 11, 2012
An interview with members of the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester, John W. Grace and Nelson Baldo. They discuss the challenges they faced being gay and serving in the military in the 1960s. They talk about the gay community in Rochester during that time, the beginnings of the Gay Liberation Front, and the organization's significance for the gay community. discuss their early lives, including their experiences serving in the United States Military. They talk about Rochester gay bars, the development of a visible gay community in Rochester, and the opening of their restaurant, Iggy's Study. The conversation then turns to discussion contemporary gay life, including the normalization and integration of gay people into society. Members of the Gay Liberation Front that are discussed include Elizabeth "Liz" Bell, Danny Scipione, Bob Osborn, and Larry Fine., Audio Interview, John Grace and Nelson Baldo, May 11, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6594
Audio Interview, Karen Hagberg, April 17, 2012
Karen Hagberg is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. She discusses her experience as a formerly closeted woman in the 1970s. She describes her involvement with the Gay Liberation Front and the Speakers Bureau as well as her relationships with Larry Fine, Patti Evans, and R.J. Alcala. She also talks about her link to the feminist movement of the time through the Gay Revolution of Women and the newspaper, the New Women's Times. Hagberg also speaks about Maxine Sobel and her experiences attending New York City pride parades., Audio Interview, Karen Hagberg, April 17, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6563
Audio Interview, Kathryn Rivers, April 27, 2012
Kathryn Rivers is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. As one of the original members of Lambda at Kodak, Rivers reveals why the Lambda at Kodak initiative was created. Rivers discusses what prompted the formation of the organization and her experiences with it as it moved forward. She mentions her encounters with individuals such as David Kosel, Sue Connelly, Deb Price, George Fisher, etc. Rivers also shares her activities as a gay woman in Rochester, which involved frequenting local gay bars (Patsy's, Silver Fox, Jim's, the Riverview, the Burgundy Basin, Dick's 43, etc.) and participating in gay activism through marches and picnics. Rivers also discusses the impact of other organizations such as ImageOut and Out & Equal., Audio Interview, Kathryn Rivers, April 27, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6581
Audio Interview, Kitty Moran Wolfsong, January 28, 2013
Kitty Moran Wolfsong is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. Wolfsong was credited with reinvigorating the Gay Alliance's youth group in the early 1990s. She was in school studying social work from 1990 to 1992. Wolfsong describes how the youth group was first set up and how meetings were held. She discusses how they advertised resources such as the Empty Closet and arranged events such as the first Day of Silence and Gay Prom. Wolfsong also speaks to public conceptions of homosexuality within Hispanic and African American communities, in light of family life and stereotypes. Wolfsong then describes how she started a Gay Straight Alliance in Franklin High School and was also involved with the Gay Lesbian Straight Education Network (GLSEN) in the late 1990s. Towards the end of her interview, Wolfsong talks about how the process of coming out has changed in contemporary times with the presence of gay individuals in the media., Audio Interview, Kitty Moran Wolfsong, January 28, 2013, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6573
Audio Interview, Kraig Pannell, October 3, 2012
Kraig Pannell is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey on his experiences growing up as a gay man of color. They discuss his experiences as a student at Bucknell University and early activism as well as his later involvement in MOCHA and other health initiatives. Throughout his recollections, Pannell describes the racism and homophobia he faced. Pannell then details the effects of the AIDS epidemic in Rochester, New York and discusses the importance of proper mental health care., Audio Interview, Kraig Pannell, October 3, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6534
Audio Interview, Larry Champoux, October 22, 2012
Larry Champoux is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. In 1992, Champoux was one of the founders of ImageOut, the Rochester LGBT Film and Video Festival in Rochester. He discusses why he developed the film festival and how it came to fruition after his participation in the Pink Flamingos and Purple Hearts Conference for LGBT awareness. Champoux explains some of his other involvement with the LGBT community in Rochester as he was on the board of the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley and was the Vice President of Rochester Lesbian and Gay Political Caucus. Champoux discusses the issue of censorship and how it ended up defunding many lesbian and gay artists and organizations. Champoux ends his interview by expressing how the LGBT community demonstrated its strength in Rochester through political, cultural, and health infrastructures as well as a media outlet. Champoux expresses his hope that the youth will take gay activism in a new direction to continue earning rights., Audio Interview, Larry Champoux, October 22, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6595
Audio Interview, Larry Fine, February 9, 2013
An interview with one of the founders of the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester, Larry Fine, conducted by Bruce Woolley. Fine talks about coming to Rochester in the late 1960s and his experiences coming out. He describes learning about the Mattachine Society in Washington, D.C. and starting the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester with Bob Osborn, Marshall Goldman, Patti Evans, and RJ Alcala. He also discusses the Speakers Bureau and the Empty Closet. He talks leaving Rochester, moving to Lincoln, Nebraska and his experiences becoming involved with the gay rights movement there., Audio Interview, Larry Fine, February 9, 2013, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:15492
Audio Interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973
An interview with the founder of the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester, Larry Fine, conducted by Bruce Jewell for an episode of the Green Thursday radio program that likely aired February 8, 1974. Fine discusses moving to Lincoln, Nebraska, the formation of gay spaces in Lincoln, the difference between the social and sexual needs of gay men, and tradition and history of gay men throughout history. They also discuss how gay men develop coping strategies for their homosexuality. Larry Fine discusses his role and hopes as a counselor, including a gay telephone hotline he works with in Nebraska. This is an edit of the original interview, which can be found in two parts as Audio Interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973: Part One and Part Two., Audio interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6625
Audio Interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973
Part of an interview with the founder of the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester, Larry Fine, conducted by Bruce Jewell for an episode of the Green Thursday radio program that likely aired February 8, 1974. Fine discusses the beginnings of the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester with Bob Osborn, Fine's move to Lincoln, Nebraska, the formation of gay spaces in Lincoln, the difference between the social and sexual needs of gay men, and tradition and history of gay men throughout history. An edited version of this interview compiled with part two can be found at Audio Interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973., Audio Interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973 : Part One, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6626
Audio Interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973
Part of an interview with the founder of the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester, Larry Fine, conducted by Bruce Jewell for an episode of the Green Thursday radio program that likely aired February 8, 1974. Bruce Jewell and Larry Fine discuss how gay men cope with being gay and the strategies they take. Larry Fine discusses his role and hopes as a counselor, including a gay telephone hotline he works with in Nebraska. An edited version of this interview compiled with part one can be found at Audio Interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973., Audio interview, Larry Fine, March 21, 1973 : Part Two, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6627
Audio Interview, Margaret Mary Lau, February 24, 2012
Margaret Mary Lau is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. Lau primarily discusses the formation of Dignity-Integrity. Lau was involved with the organization when it existed as only as a Roman Catholic organization (Dignity USA). She describes how Dignity-Integrity was formed with the Roman Catholic group merged with the Episcopal organization (Integrity, Inc.) in 1975. Lau details the leadership of Bruce Hanson and the first members of DI. Lau traces the changing demographics of DI as church-goers changed and a new generation entered. Lau reveals Sister Claude Loeb's involvement in the merge and how she was in a unique position to advocate for social justice. At the end of the interview, she talks in greater detail about her religious upbringing as well as the influence of Kevin Scahill, who fostered an environment of progress and change for the gay religious community in Rochester., Audio Interview, Margaret Mary Lau, February 24, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6569
Audio Interview, Maria Scipione, May 17, 2012
Maria Scipione is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Scipione details her involvement with the New Women's Times and second-wave feminism. She describes 1972 as an era of change in which anti-war protests inspired other social movement such as women's rights. Scipione describes her interpretation of the New Women's Times' missions and her interactions with Karen Hagberg, Martha Brown, and Maxine Sobel who spearheaded the paper. Scipione also traces the influence of the Empty Closet, Susan Soleil, and people of color. Scipione then talks about her quest for social justice, from addressing school dress codes to raising awareness about rape with events like Take Back the Night. As a rape survivor, Scipione became involved in wheatpasting and participating in the Vagina Monologues., Audio Interview, Maria Scipione, May 17, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6635
Audio Interview, Mark Siewic, May 29, 2013
Mark Siewic is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. Siewic was involved with the Gay Alliance and LGBT issues for most of his life. Siewic came to Rochester in 1983 when he began studying at the University of Rochester. He discusses the difficulties of being closeted and his involvement with Tim Mains's political campaign during his re-election. Siewic was also involved in Queer Nation-- a branch of ACT UP, which he describes as more involved with radicalizing gay/lesbian awareness rather than AIDS advocacy. Siewic then describes how he planned fundraising events at Geva Theatre, but ultimately left Queer Nation to pursue his business ventures in real estate and democratic politics. Siewic sheds light on his work with Bob Duffy and describes how they became partners in 1996. Siewic was also involved in the Empire State Pride Agenda, especially where it concerned fudnraising nd securing marriage equality. Siewic ends his interview by discussing Sue Cowell and the gay-friendly atmosphere in Rochester., Audio Interview, Mark Siewic, May 29, 2013, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:11280
Audio Interview, Marlene Gordon, September 24, 2012
Marlene Gordon is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. Gordon was an original members of the Gay Liberation Front and graduated from the University of Rochester in 1972. Gordon describes the nature of campus life and provides some details on Todd Union (the meeting place for the GLF) and Dick's 43 Lounge. Gordon moves on to describe the Riverview and her connection with the mother of the bar's owner, Lou. Gordon describes her experience being closeted while teaching in a public school in the 212. Gordon talks about the process of coming out to her family and her experiences in California with Proposition 6. Gordon describes her reaction to Harvey Milk's assassination and the resulting public discomfort. Gordon ends the interview by talking about parents' right-wing resistance to AIDS education in the 1980s., Audio Interview, Marlene Gordon, September 24, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6562
Audio Interview, Marvin Ritzenthaler, January 31, 2012
In this interview, Marvin Ritzenthaler shares about his involvement with the gay community in Rochester, including the early beginnings of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) and the Gay Alliance, and he provides history of both (including the breaking up of the GLF), a personal and detailed history of the Rochester area police documenting and keeping track of the gay men in the city, his history of coming out and struggles with dealing with his sexuality while in the seminary at St. Bernard’s and after, and his experience with receiving help with sexuality from a therapist., Audio Interview, Marvin Ritzenthaler, January 31, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6580
Audio Interview, Maureen Boyle and Vickie Fumia, January 10, 2012
Maureen Boyle and Vickie Fumia are interviewed by Kevin Indovino and Evelyn Bailey. They were the owners of Rosie's bar in Rochester. They discuss the bar’s history and the origins of its name. They share their memories of meeting in Rochester, opening the bar, and subsequently learned more about the gay community in Rochester. Boyle and Fumia reveal how they had both good and bad relationships with the police, who were often patrolling around the gay bars. Boyle and Fumia discuss what made Rosie's a special bar and the impact of the AIDS epidemic. They stated that, around 1984 and 1985, when AIDS was gaining momentum, their clientele consisted of mostly women, so they did not have to confront the impact of the disease too often. Toward the end of the interview, Boyle and Fumia discuss the culture of other gay bars like Dick's 43, Jim's, the Riverview, Tara's, the Bachelor Forum, and Friar's in Rochester., Audio Interview, Maureen Boyle and Vickie Fumia, January 10, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6596
Audio Interview, Max Reiter, February 7, 2013
Max Reiter is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. Reiter was a member of Rochester's gay community since 1963. Reiter discusses gay bars like the Blue Chip and Misty Lynn (where he saw his first drag show in 1966/1967). Reiter describes establishments on Main Street, Clinton Avenue, and Front Street as well as Midtown before it was remade. Reiter also taught at a Catholic School (St. Josaphat's) in Irondequoit after 1971. Reiter also studied cosmetology and taught at Continental Beauty School and worked at B. Forman Company. Reiter became involved in gay activism in 1974 when he entered Jim's bar. Toward the end of his interview, Reiter discusses the production and layout of Empty Closet issues and talks about going on the board of Helping People with AIDS and chairing Dining for Dollars (which he was involved with in 1994). Reiter talksk about figures like Tony Green and Paula Silvestrone and their AIDS activism in Rochester., Audio Interview, Max Reiter, February 7, 2013, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6579
Audio Interview, Michael Beatty, July 6, 2012
Michael Beatty is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Beatty discusses his experience on the Board of Directors of the Southern Tier Aids Program in Rochester. Beatty talks about his reaction to the AIDS epidemic in Rochester and about losing close friends, like Tony Green, to the disease. Beatty details how AIDS Rochester received its startup funds with Dining for Dollars. Beatty moves on to discuss the stigma of HIV infection and the general homophobia that was present at the time. Beatty stresses the importance of collaborating with other communities and organizations like the Community Health Network and Helping People with Aids before describing the merge of the AIDS Community Health Center and AIDS Rochester. Toward the end of the interview, Beatty remarks that donations for HIV/AIDS has dropped significantly since the disease became treatable and was no longer "horrific" to the public., Audio Interview, Michael Beatty, July 6, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6541
Audio Interview, Michael Robertson, February 2, 2012
An interview with Michael Robertson conducted by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Robertson discusses becoming involved in Rochester's gay community in the 1970s through the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester. He talks about the conflict between the women and men in the gay community and the establishment of the Gay Alliance through the unification of the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester, the Gay Brotherhood, the Lesbian Resource Center, the Gay Revolution of Women, and the Gay Task Force. Robertson discusses the significance of the Speakers Bureau in integrating the Alliance with the Rochester community and the Gay Alliance being incorporated as a non-profit organization. He shares his memories of police discrimination in Rochester as well as some of the political challenges that the Alliance has faced throughout the years, particularly during the first application for funding under the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act., Audio Interview, Michael Robertson, February 2, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6582
Audio Interview, Mike, 1974
The second part of an interview with a man named Mike conducted at Tolstoy College at the University of Buffalo. The interview was recorded for use in a series on the Green Thursday radio program focusing on gender roles and their impact on relationships. Mike discusses the role of masculinity in his life and the impact of gender roles on his relationships with his mother, romantic partners, and friends. He goes into detail about his experiences in high school. Mike is a member of a counseling group that uses the Transactional Analysis (T.A.) theory and methods. He describes the ways in which the group has helped him become more self-aware. Portions of the interview that were edited and censored can also be found on Green Thursday, radio program, June 30, 1974.
Audio Interview, Mike, 1974
The first part of an interview with a man named Mike conducted at Tolstoy College at the University of Buffalo. The interview was recorded for use in a series on the Green Thursday radio program focusing on gender roles and their impact on relationships. Mike discusses the role of masculinity in his life and the impact of gender roles on his relationships with his mother, romantic partners, and friends. He also speaks in-depth about his history of drug and alcohol abuse. Portions of this interview that were edited and censored can be found on Green Thursday, radio program, April 18, 1974, Audio Interview, Mike, 1974 Part One (excerpt one), and Audio Interview, Mike, 1974 Part One (excerpt two)., Audio Interview, Mike, 1974 : Part One, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6632
Audio Interview, Mike, 1974
A excerpt from an interview with a man named Mike conducted at Tolstoy College at the University of Buffalo. The interview was recorded for use in a series on the Green Thursday radio program focusing on gender roles and their impact on relationships. Mike discusses the role of masculinity in his life and the impact of gender roles on his relationships with his mother, romantic partners, and friends. He also speaks in-depth about his history of drug and alcohol abuse. This recording can also be found on Green Thursday, radio program, April 18, 1974. The uncensored version of this interview can be found on Part One of Audio Interview, Mike, 1974., Audio Interview, Mike, 1974: Part One (excerpt one), Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6607
Audio Interview, Mike, 1974
An excerpt from an interview with a man named Mike conducted at Tolstoy College at the University of Buffalo. The interview was recorded for use in a series on the Green Thursday radio program focusing on gender roles and their impact on relationships. In this excerpt, Mike continues his discussion of masculinity and gender roles and the impact they have had on his familial and romantic relationships. Portions of this interview that were edited and censored can be found on Green Thursday, radio program, April 18, 1974 and Audio Interview, Mike, 1974 Part One (excerpt one). The uncensored version of this interview can be found on Part One of Audio Interview, Mike, 1974., Audio Interview, Mike, 1974: Part One (excerpt one), Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6609
Audio Interview, Mike, 1974
In this part of the interview with Mike Anubis, Mike describes his efforts in pursuing relationships, the tensions between cliques in high school, the attempt to fulfill certain social roles, his participation in an unnamed program, his relationship with his mother, his alcoholism, and his writing and art. An excerpt from the second part of an interview with a man named Mike conducted at Tolstoy College at the University of Buffalo. The interview was recorded for use in a series on the Green Thursday radio program focusing on gender roles and their impact on relationships. Mike discusses the role of masculinity in his life and the impact of gender roles on his relationships with his mother, romantic partners, and friends. He goes into detail about his experiences in high school. Mike is a member of a counseling group that uses the Transactional Analysis (T.A.) theory and methods. He describes the ways in which the group has helped him become more self-aware. The complete uncensored interview can be found on Audio Interview, Mike, 1974: Part Two., Audio Interview, Mike, 1974 : Part Two (edit), Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6610
Audio Interview, Nicholas Williams, January 8, 2013
Nick Williams is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. Williams discusses his experiences as the conductor for Rochester's Gay Men's Chorus. He talks describes his degrees in music education and his experience as a high school teacher who was openly gay and was harassed by students. Williams returns to the discussion of the Gay Men's Chorus, detailing where they performed; how some members were closeted while others were not; how they were not allowed to politically support a candidate, but politicized some of their songs to address social issues; and how the chorus was impacted by the AIDS epidemic. At the end of the session, Williams speaks to how he experienced gay life in Rochester by frequenting bars and nightclubs in the late 1970s., Audio Interview, Nicholas Williams, January 8, 2013, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6585
Audio Interview, Ove Overmyer, February 6, 2012
Ove Overmyer is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey. Overmyer describes his work with labor, politics, and gay activism. He details his opinions about marriage equality and his experiences with the Public Employees Federation as well as GALAXe Pride at Work, AFL-CIO, Department of Transportation, the SONDA bill, and his political activity with the Monroe Country Democratic Committee. Overmyer also describes how he became a librarian after moving to Rochester in 1993. He initially arrived for rehabilitation after a car accident, but stayed in Rochester after reading the Empty Closet and meeting Susan Soleil. Towards the end of the interview, Overmyer talks more in-depth about identity and orientation growing up in Brockport, New York., Audio Interview, Ove Overmyer, February 6, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6634
Audio Interview, Pam Barrale, March 19, 2012
An interview with Pam Barrale conducted by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Barrale speaks at length about her experiences living in Rochester, New York and becoming involved in the local gay community. She discusses how she became involved in the Gay Liberation Front, her work for the Empty Closet and the Speakers Bureau, as well as her relationships with many of the members of the Gay Alliance including: Michael Robertson, Whitey LeBlanc, Tim Mains, Bill Giancursio, and Walt Delaney. She goes into detail about her experiences at local gay bars such as the Riverview, Jim’s and Rosie’s Bar. Barrale also talks about the Green Thursday radio program and her relationship with Geryllaeyn Naundorf with whom she co-hosted both the Green Thursday and Lesbian Nation radio programs multiple times. Barrale spends the majority of the interview discussing her experiences raising children in Rochester with her partner., Audio Interview, Pam Barrale, March 19, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6538
Audio Interview, Pam Pepper, September 29, 2012
An audio interview with Rochester, New York community member, Pam Pepper, conducted by Evelyn Bailey. They discuss Pepper's experience growing up in Rochester; her views on coming out, discrimination, the history of gay and lesbian bars in Rochester, and police raids. The specific bars that are mentioned include: the Bachelor Forum, the Avenue Pub, the Blue Chip, the Pink Panther, the Riverview, 212 Colvin, the Silver Fox, and Jim's., Audio Interview, Pam Pepper, September 29, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6576
Audio Interview, Pamela Barres, May 17, 2012
An interview with Pamela Barres conducted by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Barres talks about her experiences coming out as transgender and its impact on her life both personally and professionally. She discusses her career at Kodak, getting involved with Lambda at Kodak, her political activism and efforts to pass Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act (SONDA), and Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA), and her contributions to the Rochester LGBT community. She speaks about her involvement in the organization Out & Equal, the Rochester Transgender Group, the Empire State Pride Agenda, and becoming the Executive Director of the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley., Audio Interview, Pamela Barres, May 17, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6539
Audio Interview, Pat Collins and Judy Lawrence, October 31, 2011
An interview with former president of the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley, Pat Collins, and her wife Judy Lawrence conducted by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. The two women discuss their experiences coming out as well as raising children together in Rochester, New York. Pat Collins talks about growing up in West Virginia and facing sexual discrimination through her employment. She discusses getting involved with the Lesbian Resource Center at the Genesee Co-op through Patti Evans; the merger between the Lesbian Resource Center and the Gay Brotherhood to form the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley; and applying for the organization’s first grant from the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA). Collins and Lawrence talk about the significance of the Riverview for the lesbian community. They also share their memories of organizing a rally to oppose homophobic comments made by Anita Bryant., Audio Interview, Pat Collins and Judy Lawrence, October 31, 2011, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6548
Audio Interview, Patty, November 28, 1973
A woman named Patty is interviewed about building and living in a commune in upstate New York. She discusses the distribution of work between men and women in the commune, the difficulties the members had with each other, and her desire to continue living in a commune with other people., Audio Interview, Patty, November 28, 1973, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6512
Audio Interview, Paul Haney, August 7, 2013
An interview with Paul Haney conducted by Evelyn Bailey. Haney talks about his youth in Rochester and how the city has changed over the years. He discusses his experiences as a member of the Rochester City Council including the first distributions of the federal funding from the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act through United Way and the challenges that the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley faced during their application for grant funding. He also goes into detail about the significance of the Rochester Gay Mens' Chorus, the political ramifications of Tom Mooney's decision to void the lease agreement between the Chorus and the Chamber of Commerce in 1980, and the support that City Council members, including Mayor Tom Ryan and Chris Lindley, showed the gay community in response to the lease termination. He also shares his memories of fellow City Council Member Midge Costanza., Audio Interview, Paul Haney, August 7, 2013, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6564
Audio Interview, Paul Scheib, March 14, 2013
In this interview, Evelyn Bailey speaks to Paul Scheib about his role as an activist in Rochester, New York. He discusses the formation and history of ACT UP chapter in Rochester, including ACT UP’s presence at the 1988 presidential candidate debate at Eastman Theater. Scheib also tells Evelyn about an ACT UP march in Rochester in 1988, which leads him to share the history of the first Pride Parades in Rochester. He then talks about the establishment of the Gay Alliance on Atlantic Avenue as a safe space for people, the exchange between the Catholic and Episcopal churches in terms of recognizing gay marriage, and concludes with the history of Dignity-Integrity and its relationship with the larger faith community., Audio Interview, Paul Scheib, March 14, 2013, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6591
Audio Interview, Paula Silvestrone, May 12, 2012
Paula Silvestrone is interviewed by Evelyn Bailey and Kevin Indovino. Silvestrone details why she wanted to work with AIDS Rochester in 1989. Silvestorne talks about Tony Green and his influence on AIDS activism and how he presented himself as a spokesperson before he died from AIDS. Silvestrone describes the relationship between AIDS Rochester and Helping People with AIDS in the context of applying for grants. She also describes the core mission of AIDS Rochester: to provide services and make sure people had access to medication. Silvestrone traces how AIDS care moved from a health initiative to a political initiative. Silvestrone explains how she persisted in providing service for the gay community in the face of public criticism and discusses the gains with AIDS treatment over time and the effect it had on the community. Toward the end of her interview, Silvestrone describes Bill Valenti (who hired her at AIDS Rochester) and the death of John Washburn., Audio Interview, Paula Silvestrone, May 12, 2012, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6636
Audio Interview, Peter Fisher, 1974
Bruce Jewell interview Peter Fisher (writer, musician, activist) about the lives of gay people in the present and throughout history. They discuss the oppositions to gay rights in New York, including the efforts to pass several bills. They also discuss the need for gay popular media, the connection between the gay rights movement and women's liberation movement, and Fisher's new novel. Another version of this interview can be found at Audio Interview, Peter Fisher, 1974: Version Two., Audio Interview, Peter Fisher, 1974 : Version One, Rochester, New York Voices of LGBT History Project, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/islandora/object/ur:6628